Category Archives: Centre for Computing History

Go adventuring in Cambridge – and create your own world!

Go with the flow - and build your own adventure (Pic: Centre for Computing History)
Go with the flow – and build your own adventure (Pic: Centre for Computing History)

Text adventuring is one of the oldest and greatest of retro-computing game genres – and now modern computer fans can also discover how such ‘interactive fiction’ games play out – after building their own!

The Centre for Computing History in Cambridge, England is offering visitors the chance to build an adventure game using a special system known as ‘Twine’, during a workshop next Wednesday 27 May.

Twine is a brilliant online tool for constructing interactive stories, and the museum in Rene Court, Coldhams Road,  is inviting adventurers of all ages to come along and learn to use it to build a tale of dragons, spaceships or spies (or maybe all three in one story!) that you or your friends can then play through. You’ll be able to let your imagination loose and maybe learn a thing or two about coding whilst you’re at it.

Entrance to the Centre (Pic: Centre for Computing History)
Entrance to the Centre (Pic: Centre for Computing History)

This workshop, which starts at 2pm, is aimed at children aged seven and up.  Adults are welcome too! Please note that all under 14’s must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

If you’d like to see an example of Twine in action, try playing The Amazing Tale of the Storytelling Workshop, a Twine game that the Centre have put together themselves.  You’ll discover lots more about the workshop that way and have a fun adventure at the same time!  It will open in a new window and will play in all common web browsers.

Standard museum entry fees apply:  £7 for adults, £5 for children, and £20 for a family (2 adults and 2 children). There is no additional charge for this event.

Although the booking is for a specific time slot, entry to the museum is permitted all day.  The museum is open from 10 am to 5 pm.

Tea, coffee and snacks will be available from our Pac Lunch Shop.  And, plenty of seating for parents 🙂

Places are limited. Tickets must be booked in advance.  Follow this link to book:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/37672/Build-your-own-text-adventure-27-May-2015/

Payment is taken by PayPal immediately. Please print a copy of the receipt that is displayed at the end of the payment process and bring it with you as your e-ticket.

For more about the Centre, check out their website:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/

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Computing fun with bugs – in Cambridge!

A different kind of computer bug! (Pic: Centre for Computing History)
A different kind of computer bug! (Pic: Centre for Computing History)

Youngsters visiting the Centre for Computing History in Cambridge next week will have the chance to experiment with a less common ‘bug in the system’,  when the popular establishment in Rene Court, Coldhams Road is offering the chance to build a Crawling Microbug that will definitely impress everyone you know!!

On Wednesday 27 May, from 11am, they’ll be turning their Hauser Studio into an Electronics Lab., complete with soldering stations set-up and their in-house electronics expert ready to help children assemble, solder and test their very own crawling microbug ready to take home with you. What a great souvenir!

Ideal for budding electronics engineers or anyone interested in learning to solder, this is a great project where you get to build a robot bug which loves light and scuttles towards areas where it can find some!

This is a lively and unique workshop aimed at children aged from seven upwards. All under 16’s must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Spaces are limited for this hands-on session, so booking is required to ensure your place.  You can do this online by following this link:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/37660/Electronics-Lab-Build-A-Bug-27-May-2015/#

Payment is taken by PayPal immediately. Please print a copy of the receipt that is displayed at the end of the payment process and bring it with you as your e-ticket.

Please note: Whilst the Centre will make every effort to help ensure your Microbug works, careful assembly and soldering is required and they cannot be held responsible for any non-working Microbugs due to poor assembly.

This workshop session is priced at £22.00 per participant and includes the cost of the kit and entry to the museum!

Check out the Centre’s website here:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/

 

Project Odyssey is a smash for computer museum

Jason Fitzpatrick shows off rows of BBC Micros's and Raspberry Pi's at Gadget Show Live (Pic: Stuart Williams, RCN)
Jason Fitzpatrick shows off rows of BBC Micros’s and Raspberry Pi’s at Gadget Show Live (Pic: Stuart Williams, RCN)

The Centre for Computing History, the popular and fast-growing museum in Cambridge, England, is popping the corks in celebration following the massive success of their recent ‘Project Odyssey’ fundraising campaign!

The first stage of the project was launched on 10 March by museum patron Dr Hermann Hauser (of Acorn fame) and is now finished, having raised £100,000. What’s more, as this figure was reached within 30 days, it will now be matched by the generosity of Cambridge-based Redgate Software, bringing the total amount to a staggering £200,000!

The aim was to raise £110,000 to complete the refurbishment of the Centre’s main gallery and create a new core exhibition – ‘Tech Odyssey’ – which will chart the global impact of the computing revolution.

Computing education is fun - retro or otherwise! (Pic: Stuart Williams, RCN)
Computing education is fun – retro or otherwise! (Pic: Stuart Williams, RCN)

Continue reading Project Odyssey is a smash for computer museum

Still time to donate to Project Odyssey

Curator Jason Fitzpatrick, left, with Simon Galbraith of Redgate Software (pic: Centre for Computing History)
Curator Jason Fitzpatrick, left, with Simon Galbraith of Redgate Software (pic: Centre for Computing History)

One of the UK’s top computer museums has almost reached the destination of its latest fundraising effort – but you can still contribute if you donate by 10 April 2015!

Following presentations from the museum’s trustees and the launch of the new fundraising campaign – Odyssey – by museum patron Dr Hermann Hauser on 10 March by the Centre for Computing History in Cambridge, England, Simon Galbraith, CEO of Redgate Software (pictured above), threw down “a symbolic gauntlet” – and the response so far has been, according to the museum, “wonderful”.

Back in March the invited audience held their breath as Simon issued the challenge: “Redgate Software will match every pound donated to this appeal, up to £100,000, in the next 30 days.”

What’s the campaign all about? Well, the Centre is hoping to raise £110,000 to complete the refurbishment of its main gallery and create a new core exhibition – Tech Odyssey: a learning adventure – which will chart the global impact of the computing revolution.

Curator, Jason Fitzpatrick, explains: “In its present condition this building fails to do justice to the richness and variety of our collection. Although visitors can see, touch and use many of the ‘superstar’ machines of the 70s, 80s and 90s, we lack the funds needed to create an exhibition that charts how each of these computers represents a step towards the small, powerful, multi-purpose devices most of us use today.

(pic: Centre for Computing History)
(pic: Centre for Computing History)

“Refurbishment of the gallery and creation of a new exhibition, Odyssey, will help us tell the inspirational and epic story of the computing revolution to anyone – young and old, techie and non-geek alike.

Continue reading Still time to donate to Project Odyssey