Commodore Story documentary heads for stardom

The Blu-rayA new techno-nostalgia film production is headed for Kickstarter stardom – and is set to become an essential addition to the collections of fans of classic Commodore computers, games and software, including as it does, many of the charismatic creators and movers and shakers who feature in the dramatic tale of so much of that seminal computer industry and hobby community history.

The Commodore Story is a cram packed two hour documentary that will take us through American home and business computer company Commodore’s evolution from the 1970s to the 1990s, and from the PET, Vic20 and Commodore 64 to the Amiga and beyond, including many game makers and composers from the 80s and early 90s.

Well-supported already, the soon-to-be-classic crowd-funded flick has now broken its own latest £32,500 goal target and is rapidly heading for the next level – funding of £35,000 – meaning that it will hopefully be published as a double Blu-ray package alongside The Chiptune Story – Creating retro music 8-bits and 16-bits at a time.

Major Commodore collaboration
Steven Fletcher, Director - recording his Behind The Scenes Video Diary
Steven Fletcher, Director – recording his Behind The Scenes Video Diary

Produced by Wavem Studios, a feature and short film company based in London and Essex, The Commodore Story is helmed by Director Steven Fletcher, a passionate advocate for Commodore, and boasts an impressive number of 30+ collaborators, interviewees and contributors, including Commodore and Amiga Legends Leonard Tramiel, Dave Haynie, Michael Tomczyk, Greg Berlin, Randell Jesup, Hedley Davis, Ronald Nicholson and David John Pleasance with more to come as well as games programmers, 8-bit music composers, and Commodore book and magazine authors.

Pages of history
A 150 page companion book and a free copy of Wavem's DeVoid feature film are also options
A 150 page companion book and a free copy of Wavem’s DeVoid feature film are also options

Not only a documentary, the film, which will have special features and has a range of options for pledges from £10 (digital download) up to £1,850 (offering Executive Producer status, no less!) will also be published alongside a complementary full colour book. The book has its own separate starter pledge (ebook for a tenner) to upward of £25 for a printed book and ebook package.  There are also other pledge possibilities including limited-edition t-shirts, additional films, and London premiere and aftershow party tickets!

4K wahey!

4K

An earlier stretch goal now means that the production will be in 4K ultra HD definition video resolution, meaning that the highest quality will be maintained, with downloads in full resolution, and you might actually find yourself with something good to show on that expensive 4K telly you bought at last!

Come on, make your pledge

There’s just 15 days to go on Kickstarter with £33,402
pledged of the original £17,500 goal.  Why not join our editor, former Amiga User International writer Stuart Williams, and the other 855 backers in supporting the project now?

To make your own pledge and help push that top end stretch goal over £35,000, or to find out more information, beat a path to this exciting retro computing project’s Kickstarter page and get in on the act with the latest major contribution to recording the amazing boom and bust story of one of the world’s top, and it has to be said life-changing, computer companies ever.

Follow this link:  The Commodore Story

 

Images courtesy Wavem Studios

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Cracking new fanzine for Amstrad computer fans

CPC issue 1

Amstrad and other home computing hobby fanzines were a big thing back in the good old days of 8 bit – and we should know, our chief pen-pusher Stuart Williams started his editing career publishing one using a screeching Citizen 120D printer and a photocopier for the West Midlands Amstrad User Group here in England!

Decades on, though, surely fanzines are more of a thing with the terminally-obsessed followers of footie, fantasy fan-fiction or TV sci-fi? Aren’t websites, forums, Facebook and blogs the true, deep-burrowed homes and hangouts of geekish ‘amsters these days? Maybe not entirely – because a cracking little real-world, honest-to-goodness paper-based fanzine dedicated to our favourite Arnold has now come to the attention of RCN direct from the pen, or should that be the virtual dot-matrix printer, of James Ford from cpcfanzine.com.

Colour Personal Computing 1 contents
Colour Personal Computing 1 contents

The first issue of COLOUR PERSONAL COMPUTING (catchy title, eh?) was released to general acclaim back before Christmas, tagged as the Winter 2016/17 issue (arriving in January) and costing just three quid in the UK.  It was packed chock-full of enough goodies, cheeky fun and useful info to fill the Oh, Mummy-obsessed bonce of any CPC-trufan.  And we couldn’t wait to take a closer look ourselves (thanks, James!). Continue reading Cracking new fanzine for Amstrad computer fans

ST Update – 30 Years After

By Stuart Williams and Jonathan Beales

 

Cover of the launch issue of ST Update, Spring 1987
Cover of the launch issue of ST Update, Spring 1987

The past few years have seen many notable 30th anniversary celebrations in the retro computing/gaming community.  This month it’s the turn of the once-popular, but now largely forgotten (at least on the internet) dedicated British Atari ST magazine, ST Update, which was first published in spring 1987. And here at Retro Computing News [RCN], we’re doing our best to celebrate that birthday, with this, the first of a two-part article focusing on an exclusive piece of oral history given to RCN, plus a very special download for our readers, for those involved with the magazine, and for the Atari ST community at large.

Having recently spotted the rapidly approaching anniversary of the birth of ST Update, and finding almost nothing about it online, our editor Stuart Williams decided that it really deserved more of a remembrance than to fall between the cracks of Wikipedia and the various online archivers of old computer magazines, which at the time of writing still hold nothing of significance about the magazine. ST Update was also the first commercial magazine to publish Stuart’s own work, again in 1987.

Sunshine on a rainy day
ST Update Pilot Issue contents extract
ST Update Pilot Issue contents extract

March 1987, thirty years ago to this month,  saw the birth of ST Update, then a Sunshine Publications magazine, out of the same stable as the also much-missed Popular Computing Weekly.

ST Update was an excellent magazine that, unfairly, has until now gone mostly unrepresented online.  Based in Little Newport Street, London, this new kid on the Atari block was dedicated to all aspects of Atari’s finest range of computers, the ‘Atari ST’ (representing Sixteen/Thirty-two, after the Motorola 68000 CPU at its heart).  As you will read below, the magazine came out at what was becoming a gloomy time for the home computer market and computer publishing in the UK, with the 8-bit market heading towards the end of an era.

Slow, slow, quick quick slow
The Atari 1040STF (ST Update Spring 1987)
The Atari 1040STF (ST Update Spring 1987)

Launched in June 1985, the American-designed Atari 520ST and its successors were, after a relatively slow start,  set to become increasingly popular and affordable competitors, especially in Europe, to the somewhat similar but much more expensive Apple Macintosh, and the audio-visually more powerful Commodore Amiga, although the new 16-bit micros perhaps sat uneasily, not quite sure of their market, between their cheaper, better-supported 8-bit predecessors and what was to be the eventual wave of the future – the rise of the next generation Apple Mac and the IBM PC and clones. It would take a while for the new, more expensive market to mature, at least on the UK games front, which was inevitably where home computers stood or fell at the time. But for approximately a decade, the 16-bit next generation still held out the prospect of ‘power without the price’.

Competition on paper
Cover of Atari ST User, March 1986
Cover of Atari ST User, March 1986

To put things into a publishing context, of which you’ll again read more below, Atari ST User, published by Europress, had been around since March 1986, and even before that when it had started life as a pull-out section in Atari User magazine. Although Atari ST User did review games and carry demos, far more of the magazine was concerned with ‘serious’ issues such as hardware, programming, and music than its later rivals ST Action (launched in April 1998 by Gollner Publishing Ltd., the first dedicated games magazine for the 16-bit Atari) and ST Format. The latter launched August 1989 when its predecessor, the short-lived (June 1988-July 1989) dual coverage ST/Amiga Format magazine was split into two separate publications by Future Publishing.

So, ST Update was launched into a new world of sixteen-bit publishing, while the market was still forming, and as it turns out, the story of the magazine is also the story of that market.

At the suggestion of Darren Doyle, admin of the Green Meditations /|\ Atari ST group on Facebook, and the man behind http://www.atarigamer.co.uk/ and http://www.retrovideogamer.co.uk/RCN and Stuart Williams reached out to the former advertising manager and co-founder of the magazine, Jonathan Beales, now a sports broadcaster and documentary producer, who kindly spoke to Stuart at some length about ST Update, its ethos, the market it was launched into and how it got going all those years ago.

The following remarks are from the first half of what Jon told Stuart about how ST Update came into being, as he saw it back in the day – and with the benefit of his modern perspective. We’re splitting up Jon’s contribution over two pieces so we can do justice to this, over the next week or so.  Please stick with us on this, it’s a fascinating story to mark the 30th birthday of ST Update! Continue reading ST Update – 30 Years After

RCN to mark 30th birthday of ST Update magazine

Cover of the launch issue of ST Update, Spring 1987
Cover of the launch issue of ST Update, Spring 1987

The past few years have seen a number of notable 30th anniversary celebrations in the retro computing community – from the birthdays of the humble but seminal Sinclair ZX81 and the ever-popular ZX Spectrum via the versatile BBC Micro to those mighty 16/32 bit beasts, the Atari ST and Commodore Amiga.  Now it’s the turn of the once-popular, but now largely forgotten (at least on the internet) dedicated British Atari ST magazine, ST Update.

This month sees the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Sunshine Publications magazine, which was dedicated to all aspects of Atari’s finest range of computers and competitors to the Apple Macintosh and Commodore Amiga. Certainly an occasion worthy of celebration, as it was an excellent magazine that, unfairly, has gone unrepresented online – until now.

It’s also significant because the glossy title, which was published from London, England, was also the first computer magazine to publish the work of the editor of Retro Computing News, Stuart Williams! So it’s his birthday as well, in a way.

This post is just a preliminary heads-up for ST Update’s birthday, but there will be more to come soon, as to celebrate the occasion, RCN will not only be publishing a feature about the magazine and its founding – with the invaluable help of one of the founders, Jon Beales –  but making available, for the first time ever online, a pdf scanned copy of the ultra-rare launch issue, dated ‘Spring 1987’.

We hope that Atari ST fans world-wide will take part in celebrating the birthday of ST Update by sharing the feature and the pdf around the globe – and we plan to do more to raise the profile of the magazine, making more issues available as soon as time permits.

Watch this space!

 

Live Retro Comedy Night at computer museum to raise cancer funds

Live Retro Comedy Night

Cambridge’s popular Centre for Computing History is running a very special event on Saturday 4 March 2017 to help raise funds towards the support of treatment for Matthew Dons, a self-confessed British geek who is suffering from  cancer.

Matthew was unexpectedly diagnosed in July 2016 with advanced and aggressive bowel cancer, aged just 36. His family and friends are raising funds for immunotherapy treatment to give him more precious time with his wife and two small children. Matthew loves playing games with his children on his Amiga emulator and teaching them to code on the Raspberry Pi.

The Centre, located in Rene Court, Coldhams Road, says of the event:

A one-off night of mirth!! Join us for geeky comedy featuring videogames, VHS covers, 80s nostalgia, the supernatural, computing history and movies.

Proceeds from this event will support The Centre for Computing History as well as Matthew’s cancer treatment fund. Special thanks go to Raspberry Pi for helping with promotion, and the comedians who have all generously waived their performance fees.

Host for the evening is Paul Rose, aka “Mr Biffo”, writer and creator of the legendary teletext video games magazine, Digitiser. Now primarily working in TV, Paul still writes about games at www.digitiser2000.com and is creating his first crowd-funded online series, Mr Biffo’s Found Footage.

Laughter line-up

The all-star comic line-up features:

Stuart Ashen One of the UK’s most popular YouTube acts, what Stuart doesn’t know about Poundland, obscure video games and Pop Stations isn’t worth knowing. He wrote and starred in the successful movie Ashens and the Quest for the Game Child and is known for his dry wit, incisive commentary and neat beard. He is also the author of Terrible Old Games You’ve Probably Never Heard Of.

Paul Gannon Paul has written for a whole host of well-known Radio 4 comedy shows. He produces the weird and wonderful podcast CheapShow as well as the YouTube channel Barshens starring Stuart Ashen and and Barry Lewis (My Virgin Kitchen). He was also a zombie in Shaun of the Dead, which was likely typecasting.

Ash Frith Standup Ash can be seen in comedy clubs all over the UK. Currently supporting Christian O’Connell on his standup tour. Ash is a regular guest on RadioX and Absolute Radio.

Iszi Lawrence Iszi is a smart, sharp and hilarious comedian described as ‘as adept with an anecdote as she is with a one-liner’ and ‘on-the-spot funny’ by The Herald. She also hosts the hugely popular Sunday Supplement and Z List Dead List Podcasts.

Richard Sandling The king of pop culture comedy, with a passion for cinema of all sorts. He has appeared across theatre, film and TV, turning up in the BBC’s The Catherine Tate Show, Miranda and Channel 4’s Peep Show.

Times and tickets

The show will begin at 7pm and last for around 90 minutes. Advance tickets are just £10 each for this unique opportunity to see such an eclectic pool of comic talent. The Centre will be open to ticket holders from 6pm to 10pm to allow you to enjoy the exhibits and test your gaming skills on their consoles and arcade machines. Drinks will be available from a fully licensed bar provided by Lord Conrad’s Brewery.

Due to the nature of the event, the organisers recommend that all attendees should be over 15.

Find out more

For further info and to buy advance tickets at £10 each, see:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/43146/Live-Retro-Comedy-Night-Saturday-4th-March-2017/

Spaces are limited, so booking is required to secure your place. Payment is taken by PayPal immediately. Please print a copy of the receipt that is displayed at the end of the payment process and bring it with you as your e-ticket. Any remaining tickets will be available on the door for £12 each (cash or card payment).

Find out about the Centre for Computing History:

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk

Commodore Amiga Users meet in Ireland

Only Amigaaaaaaaa! [Pic Trevor Dickinson]
Only Amigaaaaaaaa! [Pic Trevor Dickinson]
Commodore Amiga fans from Ireland and beyond were able to enjoy an amazing get-together a little over a week ago, with a great turnout, fun and fascinating exhibits, and a remarkable range of guests! This report was sent in to RCN by Jarlath Reidy.

The Commodore Amiga Users Ireland Meetup 2017 took place at The Prince of Wales Hotel in Athlone on 21 January 2017, and despite being set in the very heart of Ireland, there was very much an international flavour to the event, with Irish Amigans being only too delighted to meet their friends who had travelled from overseas places such as England, Scotland, Poland, Germany – and even New Zealand! Such is the nature of world-wide Amiga fandom today.

A multi-faceted event

Communing with the Amiga in Ireland [Pic Dermot O'Halloran]
Communing with the Amiga in Ireland [Pic Dermot O’Halloran]
Soldering on! [Pic Dermot O'Halloran].
Soldering on! [Pic Dermot O’Halloran].
All kinds of machines and setup configurations were on display, and some very interesting workshops and talks were available including:

  • SWOS tournament, with a nice trophy going to the winner (congrats Kenny Gaughan).
  • Kick Off 2, Lotus 2 (four player) and Skidmarks (eight player) competitions.
  • Stunt Car Racer (congratulations to the champion, Allan Ullmann who took away a lovely trophy).
  • AROS – Current status with Neil Cafferkey (Core developer and Prism2v2 driver author).
  • Soldering Workship – With Rob Cranley of Amiga Future.
  • Music Creation on Amiga – With Jarlath Reidy and a surprise drop in from Mike Clarke (Psygnosis / Atomicom) who took it to a whole new level!
  • Crash Course in Blitz Basic – With Jarlath Reidy & Rob Cranley
  • Q&A sessions with Trevor Dickenson of A-EON fame and David Pleasance (formerly of Commodore UK) and Hogne Titlestad (FriendUP), Jon Hare (via Skype) as well as Mike Labatt of Cloanto, Mike Clarke (Psygnosis/Atomicom) and more.
  • Amibian machines were there with 3D printed Amiga cases.
  • X1000 and X5000 machines as well as the ALICE laptop were also on display.

Listening attentively [Pic Dermot O'Halloran].jpg
Listening attentively [Pic Dermot O’Halloran].jpg
Trevor Dickinson of A-EON speaks [Pic Dermot O'Halloran].
Trevor Dickinson of A-EON speaks [Pic Dermot O’Halloran].

Goodies to win

Spot prizes at the event included wifi cards (thanks to Sir_Lucas of Amibay for donating these), boxed games  (thanks to Craig Harrisson, Lukasz Mulczynski, Mattie Whittle, Danny Cork and others, Amiga hardware (audio sampler, frame grabber with huge thanks to Mattie Whittle), and Amiga branded notebooks, posters, badges, etc (thanks to Trevor Dickinson).

Sordan (of sordan.ie) set up a shop that day, providing a service for everyone’s hardware and software needs. Rob Cranley performed recaps and repairs on several machines. Dermot O’Halloran took fantastic photos and we had additional video and photos taken by Kenny Gaughan, Ravi Abbott (of the Retro Hour Podcast) who also provided music later on. Sound was provided by Colin Reid.

Continue reading Commodore Amiga Users meet in Ireland

Amiga group goes from strength to strength

A busy SWAG Meet #3 gets going at Swindon Makerspace. [Pic Steve Netting]
A busy SWAG Meet #3 gets going at Swindon Makerspace. [Pic Steve Netting]
A popular British retro computing group focusing on the Commodore Amiga is continuing to prove that, more than three decades on from its birth, rumours of this classic computer’s death have been greatly exaggerated. This report of the South West Amiga Group’s latest meeting has been sent in on their behalf by members Brian Hedley and Robert Hazelby.

On Saturday 14 January 2017, the third South West Amiga Group (SWAG) meeting was held at what has now become our regular venue; the Swindon Makerspace.

Prior to each meeting we try and plan a rough theme so that those coming along have some idea as to what to expect. At this SWAG meeting our theme was Amiga vs the 8-bits. The Commodore Amiga was the platform of choice for a great many fantastic games, but on some occasions the same title on an 8-bit was actually better. To this end, at this meeting we had an Amstrad CPC464 running the recently released Pinball Dreams conversion using a DDI3 Floppy Emulator and a recently refurbished and AY sound-fixed Sinclair Spectrum +3, complete with a DivIDE Enjoy interface running various games.

Preparing to test an Acorn Electron. With Derek Fellowes, Dave Rowland, Steve Netting, Scott MacDonald and Zeb Elwood. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
Preparing to test an Acorn Electron. With Derek Fellowes, Dave Rowland, Steve Netting, Scott MacDonald and Zeb Elwood. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
One of our attendees also brought along a ZX UNO FPGA based machine which could be seen running recreations of various eight-bit computer systems including the MGT Sam Coupé, BBC Micro and the Spectrum. We even had an original Acorn Electron up and running once it had received some TLC from a SWAG member.

Naturally, as this was a SWAG meet, we had plenty of Amiga machines scattered about the room. Amongst the stash was an A600 with a Vampire V2 (Black Edition) FPGA-based accelerator board, which we’d installed last meeting and which was now running DOOM at a very fluid frame rate.

This Amstrad has been updated to modern storage with a DDI3 floppy emulator, complete with LCD display. [Pic Steve Netting]
This Amstrad has been updated to modern storage with a DDI3 floppy emulator, complete with LCD display. [Pic Steve Netting]
An RGB-modded Amiga CD32 console was being used to show demos and was hooked up to a Commodore 1084S monitor. The demos were those from the recently released Press Play on Pad CD.

A CD32 motherboard being re-capped, with Zeb Elwood (standing) and Scott MacDonald. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
A CD32 motherboard being re-capped, with Zeb Elwood (standing) and Scott MacDonald. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
Speaking of recent releases, we were visited at the meet by the one and only Galahad of the coding group Scoopex, who has been working on various ST ports to Amiga. Following his conversion of Denton Designs’ game Where Time Stood Still he has been chipping away at converting the Bubble Bus classic arcade adventure Starquake. The plan was to release the completed conversion at the meet, and while we were able to get it working on one Gotek floppy emulator equipped Amiga, the floppy disk routines needed some work, and the graphic routines required some slight tweaks on Indivision hi-res graphics board-based A1200s. When the game was running we were all pleased to see how well it ran, and the new music produced specially for this Amiga release was a joy to hear.

Following the meet Galahad contacted the group to say that he had now fixed the issues and Starquake was undergoing what would hopefully be the last round of testing before release. It was exciting for SWAG members to play a small part in the beta testing of this much anticipated conversion.

Elsewhere in the packed  room, we had a modern Amiga One 64-bit PowerPC-based computer running various games and utilities. All who saw it were impressed at just how responsive Amiga OS4.1 was, and just how nippy the applications were to use. Now, if only the cost could come down a bit!

A1200s assemble!

Dual screen Amiga 1200. Indivision output on the left. Standard RGB output from the Amiga monitor port on the right. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
Dual screen Amiga 1200. Indivision output on the left. Standard RGB output from the Amiga monitor port on the right. [Pic Robert Hazelby]
There were also three Amiga A1200s in the room. The computer equipped with a Gotek drive was being used to beta test Starquake. The second was an expanded system incorporating an ACA1233/40MHz/128MB, 4GB CompactFlash HD, Indivision AGA Mk2cr, Gotek, external drive, and an external kipper2k CompactFlash adaptor, PCMCIA-> CF/SD). Just a few things added, then! The third was an A1200 Power Tower, which had been added to gradually over the last 20 or so years. This was equipped with an 80 gigabyte hard drive, internal and external floppy drives, 56x CD ROM, a network card, and Indivision AGA, and a MAS Player. The Amiga was hooked-up to two monitors – a nice Dell LCD for Workbench and point & click game use, and a Commodore 1942 CRT for those arcade titles and demos where smooth 50hz scrolling were needed. The MAS Player was demoed to a number of SWAG members, and considering its price (under 50UKP), produces excellent results.

Continue reading Amiga group goes from strength to strength

Viva Amiga – the Review

The Amiga Won't Die

ANDY WARHOL,  BUZZ ALDRIN, R.J. MICAL AND DAVE HAYNIE ALL IN ONE HOUR . WHAT MORE COULD YOU ASK?

What can you say about a one hour (and 3 minutes!) documentary  film about a series of computers? One that takes you rushing down a wormhole into the days of your youth and then back to the future through a roller-coaster ride of highs and lows that in turns exhilarate, sadden and maybe, just maybe inspire hope for the future?

Viva Amiga: The Story of a Beautiful Machine is a brand-new production from Director/Producer Zach Weddington and the FilmBuff/Rocksteady team in the USA. It was funded via a Kickstarter campaign and has now gone on to take the iTunes download charts by storm (other sources are available, see our news item here.)

Skilfully rendered, Amiga Bill meets Amiga designer Jay Miner.
Skilfully rendered, Amiga Bill meets Amiga designer Jay Miner.

If you’ve never heard of the Commodore Amiga (or, dare I say it, were an Atari ST enthusiast back in the day), you might wonder what all the fuss is about.  Hold on a moment, and rewind back to our feature celebrating the 30th birthday of the computer that ‘came from the future’, and in 1985 started today’s multimedia revolution: https://retrocomputingnews.com/2015/07/23/happy-30th-birthday-amiga/

Suffice to say that the Amiga range did things that no other computer could do for a decade. Things that we take for granted today, but which all started there with the Amiga 1000, and its successors, which revolutionised computer art, music, photography and video production. Until those glittering dreams shattered and came tumbling down, through no fault of the Amiga’s creators. But something wonderful had happened. The world had changed.

The film

Viva Amiga

Through insightful pieces to camera with many people who, it has to be said, are still legends in the Amiga community and surprisingly accessible thanks to Facebook (in fact, they’re part of that community) seamlessly wrapped up in slick graphics and nostalgic archive footage from past promo videos and adverts, location pictures plus more recent retro computing community-based events and music footage from around the world, Viva Amiga opens up a wormhole back to a time when what we now take for granted in computers was new, and fresh, and when the little guys with the brains, the big ideas and  the soaring imagination really could break through into the future.

The film, backed with a powerful electro soundtrack by Ben Warfield and Josh Culler takes us from the early 1980s inception of the Amiga (later bought out by Commodore) as the astonishing concept of a small band of inspired technologists who thought they could leapfrog the functional but not very inspiring computer technology of the day (and how!), via the initially remarkable worldwide success of the affordable but powerful Amiga as the post 8-bit next step for Commodore, to the years of corporate greed and management incompetence that caused Commodore’s collapse in the USA and the domino effect that collapsed their subsidiaries around the globe.

R. J. Mical, Amiga software engineer, is one of many powerful voices presented from among the Amiga creators.
R. J. Mical, Amiga software engineer, is one of many powerful voices presented from among the Amiga creators.

Then, on a rocky road from the post-Commodore phase of ever-shifting sands where the Amiga technology was sold off and was eventually broken up amongst a number of different European and American companies whose reach in some cases largely exceeded their grasp, to the present time when new concepts of Amiga in hardware and software are being revived for what is presently a niche hobby market. Finally, it also looks at something of the inspired global community of retro Amiga fans or ‘Amigans’ who still love to work and play with the machine that, to hijack a phrase from one-time competitors Apple, really was designed ‘for the rest of us’.

For Amiga users past and present, if you lived through those times then this is a powerful nostalgia piece which will take you back with a bang, courtesy of the often emotional voices of many of those behind the power of Amiga.  With remarkable music and powerful visuals, Viva Amiga will in turns exhilarate you and sadden you. It will make you laugh and it may even make you cry for what was lost. But that’s the essence of the story of the computer that wouldn’t die, that still lives on in hundreds, maybe thousand of homes around the world, and lurks in lofts and attics waiting to be rediscovered by a new generation. It serves to remind you, and most definitely me, that the Amiga was never only about the hardware and the software, it was, and remains, as much about the people who created it and who used it. In a strange way, the Amiga is a part of us and we are part of it, and while that may have faded somewhat with the years, this film brings that reality back into bright, colourful focus.

Conclusion
The late, great, much-missed Amiga engineer Dave Needle (in the hat), to whom the film is dedicated, with part of the Amiga team.
The late, great, much-missed Amiga engineer Dave Needle (in the hat), to whom the film is dedicated, with part of the Amiga team.

This is a film with heart. If you’re looking for the dry detail of a Discovery Channel epic in Zach Weddington’s rawly-emotional but nonetheless highly-polished Amigan opus, you’re not exactly going to find that here. That would take a whole series of films, there’s only so much you can do in an hour and I’m not entirely sure there’s quite the material or the market out there for it. I’d love to see a two hour version of Viva Amiga; although I didn’t feel the film was exactly too short (and it’s not bad value to buy as a download) I was left wanting more. The film made me want more. Maybe there could be follow-ups exploring more of the post-Commodore phase and taking a wider look at what people are doing with the Amiga today. Who knows. Zach is working on another exciting retro project at the moment.

What you do get in spades from Viva Amiga: The Story of A Beautiful Machine (and it WAS beautiful, in form and concept) is the essence of the spirit of the machine and its makers, and if you look carefully you will also see your own reflection in the TV screen, which seems entirely appropriate.

In conclusion, if you’re an Amiga fan, apart from the chance to see more of the story than has been widely shown before, and much more of the people who still inspire the community today, what you will really get from this fascinating film is a desperate yearning to be back in those heady days when the future was being re-written by a crazy, inspired gang of people who, let’s face it, you’d just love to party with like it’s 1985.

Stuart Williams

More info

For further information and ways of buying Viva Amiga, check out the filmmakers’ website: https://amigafilm.com/

And their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/vivaamiga/

Images courtesy FilmBuff/Rocksteady

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